Alaska Resource Data File

Alaska Resource Data File FAQs

Available as [Questions & Answers] - [Outline] - [Parseable text]

Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title: Alaska Resource Data File (ARDF)
Abstract:
The Alaska Resource Data File (ARDF) is a database of mines, prospects, and mineral occurrences in Alaska. It contains information compiled from published and unpublished sources from industry, U.S. Bureau of Mines (BOM), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and other government and private sources. ARDF is not a mining claims database.
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    U.S. Geological Survey, Unknown, Alaska Resource Data File (ARDF).

    Online Links:

    This is part of the following larger work.

    U.S. Geological Survey, Unknown, National Mineral Resource Data System (MRDS).

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: 172.82
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -130.016
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 69.63
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 51.6
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Calendar_Date: 2017Currentness_Reference:
    ARDF is updated on an irregular schedule. Updated records are published as versions to U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1225. The full ARDF dataset is available https://ardf.wr.usgs.gov.
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: database
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      Indirect_Spatial_Reference:
      ARDF has fields Latitude and Longitude to describe point locations for each site or site area.
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 0.0001. Longitudes are given to the nearest 0.0001. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Decimal degrees.
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    ardfcomp.fmp12
    ARDF records are maintained in a Filemaker Pro database. The data is available in native format or as comma separated value (.csv) format. Database fields are described here in the metadata, and also in file explain.pdf, which is available at url https://ardf.wr.usgs.gov. (Source: Author defined)
    Site name(s)
    Also known as 'Site'. This field contains the name or names for the site as found in the literature. It may be a proper name or name of a nearby geographic feature. Site is 'Unnamed', if the site does not have a proper name, does not coincide with a geographic feature, and has never or only informally been identified with a geographic name. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Site type
    Sites are classified as Mine, Mines, Prospect, Prospects, Occurrence, or Occurrences. In some cases, the only suggestion of a mineral deposit existing at a site is that a claim or claims have been staked there. These sites are included in ARDF if 1) the claim or claims have been identified as a site in a previous publication (may have an MRDS number); or 2) there is clear evidence that the claim or claims have had substantial work by a reputable source. However, ARDF is NOT a claim-location database. (Source: Author defined)
    ValueDefinition
    Mine or MinesMines have had past production, though it may be small or trivial.
    Prospect or ProspectsProspects have had some mapping, or geochemical or geophyscial surveys, or physical excavation by industry.
    Occurrence or OccurrencesMineral occurrences include unexplored occurrences of minerals of economic interest, or areas with multiple samples having substantial values of one or more metals as determined by analysis or mineralogy. By convention, an occurrence does not become a prospect if only government workers have found or studied it.
    Site status
    The level of current activity at the site. This is the best estimate by the compiler of recent activity at the time the ARDF record was updated, and is somewhat subjective. It is not a legal definition of claim validity. Activity is not restricted to excavation or other physical exploration, but may include substantial geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, or ground geophysics within the last several years. (Source: Author defined) Values include Active, Active?, Probably inactive, Inactive, and Undetermined.
    Production?
    Also known as 'Production' or 'Production status'. A brief description of production from the site. (Source: Author defined) Values are restricted to 'None', 'Undetermined', 'Yes', 'Yes, small', 'Yes, medium', and 'Yes, large'. An example of 'Small' production is minor gold from a placer deposit; a 'Large' example would be the Alaska-Juneau Mine; and 'Medium' production is somewhere in between.
    Quadrangle name
    Name of 1:250,000 scale quadrangle. (Source: Author defined) The 1:250,000 scale quadrangles in Alaska are listed in ardfcomp.fmp12 in the 'Quadrangles' pick list in ardfcomp.fmp12.
    Quad-250
    Two-letter code for the 1:250,000 scale quadrangle, as listed in ardfcomp.fmp12 in the 'Quadrangles' Layout. (Source: Author defined) See ardfcomp.fmp12 'Quadrangles' pick list for both the 2-letter code and full name for 1:250,000 scale quadrangles in Alaska.
    Quad-63360
    A code used to designate the 1:63,360 scale USGS topographic map sheet on which the site is located. The code consists of a letter (A-D), a hyphen, and a number (1-8), and originates in the southeast corner of the quadrangle. The letter identifies the tier (or 15 degrees of longitude). The number ranges from 1 through 6, or 1 through 8, depending on the quadrangle, and increases from east to west. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Latitude
    Latitude of the site in decimal degrees. In the early written records the certainty of the location was shown by the number of decimal values given. In later records, all values were recorded to 4 decimal places, and the certainty of the location was described in the 'Location' or 'Location description and accuracy' field. The latitude and longitude values in this data set were collected using the NAD27 datum up until the early 2000's. In more recent years, the data was collected using the NAD83 datum. Future work will be done to correct this confusion. (Source: Author defined)
    Range of values
    Minimum:51.6000
    Maximum:69.6300
    Units:degrees
    Longitude
    Longitude with positive value for western hemisphere. In the rare case of a site located in the eastern hemisphere, the values is given as a negative number. Use field Long_GIS for negative values in the western hemisphere. In the early written records the level of certainty of the location was shown by the number of decimal values given. In later records, all values were recorded to 4 decimal places, and the certainty of the location was described in the 'Location' or 'Location description and accuracy' field. The latitude and longitude values in this data set were collected using the NAD27 datum up until the early 2000's. In later years, the data was collected using the NAD83 datum. Future work will be done to correct this confusion. (Source: Author defined)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-172.8200
    Maximum:178.8000
    Units:degrees
    Last report date
    Date when the record was compiled or updated. This is not the date of the last publication on the site. It is the date that a competent geologist reviewed the information in the record and, if necessary, added information to bring it up to date. The date indicates that the updater was satisfied that the record was complete and accurate as possible as of that date. (Source: Author defined) The date is entered in the form MM/DD/YYYY.
    Location description and accuracy
    Also known as 'Location'. This is a narrative description of the location of the mineral deposit and its areal extent, as well as an assessment of the accuracy of the location as given in the latitude and longitude fields. The locality description is keyed to geographic names on the appropriate 1:63,360 scale topographic map and located by section, township, and range. (Source: Author defined) free text
    ARDF No
    Also known as 'ARDF no.'. This is a unique label assigned to each mineral deposit in the database. The form of the ARDF number is the two-letter 1:250,000 scale quadrangle code followed by a three digit number. (Source: Author defined) free text
    MRDS No(s):
    Also known as 'MRDS no.'. This is the unique identification number used in the USGS National Mineral Resource Data System (MRDS). Most records do not have MRDS numbers as the MRDS database is not currently maintained. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Main commodities
    Also known as 'Commodities, main'. List of dominant elements or commodities of real or potential economic value in the mineral deposit. Commodities are listed alphabetically by chemical symbol; commodities such as barite, chromite, gypsum, and jade are spelled out. When described collectively, rare-earth elements = REE; platinum group elements = PGE. The chemical symbols are used for individual REE and PGE elements if they have been cited by element specifically as the commodities of interest at a site. Although arsenic is rarely a commodity of economic interest, it is commonly a pathfinder element and may be listed among the other commodities. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Other commodities
    Also known as 'Commodities, other'. These commodities are present in minor amounts as determined by analysis or mineralogy. 'Other' may include by-products from a mine. Distinguishing 'main' and 'other' may not be possible for prospects and occurrences. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Ore minerals
    An alphabetical list of the ore minerals at the site. By convention, the ore minerals include all of the native metals, sulfides and sulfosalts, metallic oxides and metal-rich minerals of real or potential economic value. This includes pyrite and arsenopyrite if they are of economic value. The relative abundance should be described in the 'Geologic description' field. Barite, gypsum, chromite, fluorite, and the like may be listed here if they are the chief minerals of economic interest. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Gangue minerals
    An alphabetical list of the non-economic minerals at the site that cannot be avoided in mining. As conventionally used, gangue minerals are silicates, carbonates, and other minerals that are intergrown with the ore minerals. The term 'gangue' mineral was originally used in the context of classic vein or replacement deposits and may not apply in discussing the mineralogy of many deposits. 'Gangue' usually does not include the minerals in the host rock, nor does it normally include alteration minerals. Minerals like barite, fluorite, and gypsum are usually included as gangue minerals if present in relatively minor amounts. The relative abundance of the gangue minerals should be described in the 'Geologic description' field. This field may be blank. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Deposit model
    There are three ways to describe Deposit model. 1) Classified as one of the Cox and Singer (1986) or Bliss (1992) deposit models, 2) Classified by referring to a published source other than Cox and Singer (1986) or Bliss (1992), or 3) Defined in general terms for lack of or very limited evidence. A query may be appropriate, such as 'Porphyry copper?'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Deposit model number after Cox and Singer (1986) or Bliss (1992)
    Also known as 'Deposit model number' and 'Cox and Singer (1986) or Bliss (1992)'. Entry is the deposit model number for Cox and Singer (1986) or Bliss (1992) deposit models. Only used if field 'Deposit model' is a Cox and Singer model or Bliss model. (Source: Bliss, J.D., ed., 1992, Developments in mineral deposit modeling: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2004, 168 p. Cox, D.P., and Singer, D.A., eds., 1986, Mineral deposit models: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1693, 379 p. ) free text
    Geologic description
    Full description of the geology and character of the deposit or occurrence. Should include information about the host rock, structure of the host and mineralized system, mineralogy and mineralogical relations, alteration, age, and the shape and form of the deposit. This field may duplicate information in other fields. This field is empty in some ARDF records. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Workings and exploration
    Also known as 'Working/exploration'. A description of the exploration done to evaluate the prospect or occurrence, or a description of the workings at the mine. For mineral occurrences, this field includes the exploration work or evidence to suggest mineral potential. For prospects and mines, this field should include who has worked on or mined the site, and when. For some sites, the data may include multiple generations of work by different companies. Geochemical or geophysical work should be noted and may include a brief summary of the findings. This field is empty in some ARDF records. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Alteration
    Description of the alteration at the deposit and the source of the information. This field is empty in some ARDF records. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Age of mineralization and source of the information. This field is empty in some ARDF records.
    Also known as 'Age'. This is the age of mineralization and the evidence for the age. May be an age, age range or inferred age. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Production notes
    A summary of published or publicly available production figures with citation. For some deposits, the numbers may be incomplete for some years, or not available. This field should summarize the chronology of production up to and including the present if the mine is still active. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Reserves
    Nonproprietary reserve or resource figures. Values are referenced to a source document. For some deposits, there may be conflicting calculations of reserves; in these cases, the different figures are provided with reference to the source, year, and character of each. The terms 'reserves' and 'resources' are not strictly defined. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Additional comments
    Includes information considered important for the site, but not appropriate for the other fields. Information may include restrictions on mineral exploration and development due to land status. May also include enviromental issues. (Source: Author defined) free text
    References
    Also known as 'Expanded References'. Lists published references and unpublished reports by industry or other organizations that have been cited in the record. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Primary reference
    Short form reference citation to the single best or most complete source of information on the site. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Reporters
    The individual(s) responsible for compiling or updating the ARDF record. Entry should be the reporter's name, followed by his/her affiliation or address in parentheses. The first name in the list is the initial compiler. The most recent reporter's name is added to the end of the list of reporters' names. (Source: Author defined) free text
    District
    As of 2010, the District field has been abandoned, but not deleted. Previously, ARDF used the mining districts developed by Ransome and Kerns for the U.S. Bureau of Mines. This scheme does not coincide with any current political or recording-district boundary and has fallen out of use. Also, the term 'district' is often used informally for groups of deposits based on local convention rather than a formal statewide system. (Source: Ransome, A.L., and Kerns, W.H., 1954, Names and definitions of regions, districts, and subdistricts in Alaska: U.S. Bureau of Mines Information Circular 7679, 91 p. http://www.dggs.alaska.gov/webpubs/usbm/ic/text/ic7679.PDF) free text
    Host rock
    This field has been abandoned, but not deleted. Description of the geology should be in field 'Geologic description'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Host rock age
    This field has been abandoned, but not deleted. Description of the geology should be in field 'Geologic description'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Assoc ign rock
    This field has been abandoned, but not deleted. Description of the geology should be in field 'Geologic description'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Ign rock age
    This field has been abandoned, but not deleted. Description of the geology should be in field 'Geologic description'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    References
    The method of keeping references for ARDF has changed and this field is no longer used. See field 'Expanded References'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    State
    US state where the site is located. (Source: Author defined) All entries should be 'AK' for Alaska.
    Reporter affiliation
    This field is no longer used. The reporter's affiliation should be noted in the 'Reporter(s)' field. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Lat-DMS
    This field in no longer used. For geographic location data, see fields 'Latitude' and 'Longitude'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Long-DMS
    This field in no longer used. For geographic location data, see fields 'Latitude' and 'Longitude'. (Source: Author defined) free text
    Long-GIS
    Also known as 'Long_GIS'. This field is a calculated field to be the negative of the value in 'Longitude'. With this sign change, a user may use fields 'Latitude' and 'Long-GIS' to plot the site in the northwest quadrant in GIS software. (Source: Author defined)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-178.8
    Maximum:-130.016
    Units:degrees

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • U.S. Geological Survey
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Frederic Wilson
    4210 University Drive
    Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4626
    U.S.A.

    907-786-7000 (voice)
    fwilson@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

ARDF is mainly focused on metallic commodities. Common industrial minerals or commodities, such as sand, gravel and crushed stone, and limestone are not included in ARDF, nor are energy minerals such as peat, coal, and oil and gas. However, uranium, thorium, and rare earth elements, as well as some high unit value industrial minerals, such as barite, jade, graphite, and gypsum, are included.

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: Unknown (process 1 of 1)
    ARDF is a database of descriptions of mines, prospects, and mineral occurrences in Alaska. The records are compiled from published literature, unpublished reports and data from various sources, including the U.S. Bureau of Mines, U.S. Geological Survey, and industry. Compilation of this database is an ongoing process and each report is a progress report. The records are reviewed and updated on an irregular schedule.
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
    The location of a site is given in decimal degrees in the Latitude and Longitude fields. The coordinates in early ARDF records were given to 2 or 3 decimal places, as an indication of accuracy. Later ARDF records give 4 decimal places in the Latitude and Longitude fields, and explain the certainty of the location in the 'Location description' field. Some sites actually encompass extensive areas or linear zones. For these, the geographic coordinates should be the center of the area or linear zone.
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    Not all fields are filled out for every record. Information may not have been available at the time the record was updated.
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?
    not applicable

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
None. Users are advised to read the metadata for the dataset thoroughly to understand appropriate use and data limitations.
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Attn: Damon Bickerstaff
    12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
    913 National Center
    Reston, VA 20192
    U.S.A.

    703-648-6351 (voice)
    dbickers@usgs.gov
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set? Alaska Resource Data File (ARDF)
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    Unless otherwise stated, all data, metadata and related materials are considered to satisfy the quality standards relative to the purpose for which the data were collected. Although these data and associated metadata have been reviewed for accuracy and completeness and approved for release by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding the display or utility of the data on any other system or for general or scientific purposes, nor shall the act of distribution constitute any such warranty.
  4. How can I download or order the data?
    • Availability in digital form:
      Data format: fmp12 (Filemaker Pro v. 12) Size: 55
      Network links: https://ardf.wr.usgs.gov
      Data format: .csv (comma separated value) format Size: 25
      Network links: https://ardf.wr.usgs.gov
    • Cost to order the data: None. No fees are applicable for obtaining this data set.


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 13-Feb-2017
Last Reviewed: 23-Feb-2017
Metadata author:
U.S. Geological Survey
Attn: Nora Shew
4210 University Drive
Anchorage, AK 99508
U.S.A.

907-786-7000 (voice)
nshew@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

Generated by mp version 2.9.40 on Mon Feb 27 12:06:26 2017